Knockdown-rebuild project: What you need to know before you begin



Gallery

A knockdown-rebuild is one of the most common kinds of new home projects in Australia’s major cities, but it is also worth considering whether this option is right for you. Here are a few helpful tips from HomeQuest to help you decide and to learn more

Knockdown-Rebuilds involve demolishing an existing home to build fresh on the same block. Although a very popular building method, it is always worth researching whether this style of build works best for your site and for the lifestyle you wish to live in your new home.

Advantages of a Knockdown-Rebuild Project

Because a knockdown-rebuild happens on your block of land, you get to stay in the same neighbourhood. This means that your kids can stay in the same school and your family can maintain their existing routines once they move back in to the new home. For family flexibility, it can also be a great opportunity to upsize/downsize without needing to move to a new suburb or street.

A knockdown-rebuild on an existing property can also mean that you may choose to keep existing improvements that you have previously made, such as a tennis court, pool or shed.

In many cases, older homes that are most commonly demolished for knockdown-rebuild projects are located on larger blocks of land than modern estates. This means that an added advantage of not moving can be greater land area, offering more flexibility and living space.

How popular are knockdown-rebuild projects?

According to the Housing Industry of Australia, nearly a third of all new detached homes are knockdown-rebuild homes. It is a particularly popular trend in suburbs 5km to 20km from the CBD, and in many cases this is because it can be more cost-efficient than a large-scale home renovation. Of course, it’s important to consider your needs and budget when making this decision, and researching the best home builder for you.

Where do you start planning a knockdown-rebuild home?

Much like any other home project, it pays to do your research by finding builders that suit your budget and tastes, and then speaking with them to get a clearer understanding of the process, choices available and costs involved.

Visiting a display village, in particular one with a variety of builders such as HomeQuest, can also be a great way to begin to understand what you are really looking for in a home as well as get an in-person feel for how a design might translate to your lifestyle.

Is a knockdown-rebuild more expensive than building on a vacant block?

When determining the best option for your new home, you may also be considering a new home on a vacant block. Average demolition costs can be between $25,000 and $50,000 but this might only be a small percentage of the overall cost, meaning that the additional investment does not have as much effect on the build decision as staying in the suburb you love.

For more information

HomeQuest

MORE FROM HomeQuest:
Lifestyle inclusions: what should you include when you build?

Lifestyle inclusions: what should you include when you build?

We all know about lifestyle inclusions - those extras offered by your builder that often help make a house into a bit more of a "home". But often, when it comes to the final agreement, these inclusions are often more complex that once thought. And does it pay to add them into a build, or is it worth installing upgrades further down the road?
2 Shares
You May Also Like
Blue September is a nationwide campaign that drives awareness for all cancers that affect men – not just prostate and testicular cancer, but also bowel, lung, liver, pancreatic and other cancers, and raises vital funds for Australian Prostate Cancer Research and the Australian Cancer Research Foundation.

Todd Devine turns blue for cancer awareness

Blue September is a nationwide campaign that drives awareness for all cancers that affect men – not just prostate and testicular cancer, but also bowel, lung, liver, pancreatic and other cancers, and raises vital funds for Australian Prostate Cancer Research and the Australian Cancer Research Foundation.